What Happens After Your Hearing?

You may be wondering what happens after your hearing.

The arbitrator will forward the decision regarding your fee dispute (called an “award”) within 15 working days after your hearing is over. Occasionally, the process may take a few more days, depending on the arbitrator’s or mediator’s schedule.

If your hearing was heard by a three-member panel the decision regarding your fee dispute will be forwarded within 25 days after your hearing is over. Again, the process may take a few more days, depending on the panel members’ schedules.

Please have patience with the process. We are working hard to file all paperwork as required by law in order to protect everyone involved.

We review the documentation and then forward the award (the decision) to both you and your lawyer.

Notice of Your Rights After Fee Arbitration

This Notice will be sent to you along with the award (the decision). Read it carefully.

This Notice will explain the rights you may have once the arbitration or mediation is completed and the steps you must take to move forward.

If you are unsure of your rights or have questions after reading this Notice, you should consult an attorney.

Each of the procedures described in the Notice has an important deadline. You may lose your legal rights if you miss these deadlines.

If you are owed money and you need help collecting this money from your lawyer, call

State Bar of California Mandatory Fee Arbitration
Phone: (415) 538-2020.

Contact Us

Once you have thoroughly reviewed all the information available in this section, please call us with additional questions that you may have.

Emily Day
Fee Arbitration Program Coordinator
Phone: (925) 370-2541

Definitions

Arbitrator

An arbitrator is a qualified attorney who must meet certain requirements and is trained to be an arbitrator before being assigned to your case.

An arbitrator will gather evidence from both you and your lawyer, listen to your statements, and make a decision. This decision could, or could not, be legally binding.

The arbitrator is a neutral professional and has no financial, official or personal interest in the fee dispute between you and your lawyer.

Most arbitrators are usually lawyers, but there is always one non-lawyer arbitrator on a three-person panel.

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Mediator

A mediator is a qualified attorney, or non-attorney professional who must meet certain requirements and is trained to be a mediator before being assigned to your case.

The mediator will help you negotiate with your lawyer to hopefully reach a settlement without going to Court or continuing to Fee Arbitration.

The mediator is a neutral individual and has no financial, official or personal interest in the fee dispute between you and your lawyer.

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